The Future of Digital Media: More Video, Smaller Screens (Report)

Internet users consume more video than ever on an average of two or more devices.

Digital content marketing has grown increasingly complicated, a result of more dynamic audiences and a general shift toward video as a primary focus. A report from content marketing and distribution agency Valnet examines what’s coming for content marketing and content in general in 2017.

It’s not enough to just create content for the web anymore. With the proliferation of devices, content needs to be both mobile-focused and platform-agnostic to meet the needs of a diverse audience. 88 percent of consumers surveyed by Valnet report reading and viewing content on multiple devices and use on average 2.42 devices simultaneously.

Indeed, multiple devices has become an integral part of how people consume content. What’s more, video consumption is higher than ever, but screens are getting smaller and smaller, which creates a strange dichotomy for video streaming services. 51 percent of all video is now viewed on mobile, and 50 percent of U.S. households used streaming services for the first time during 2016.

Speed is vital for maintaining the attention of viewers, for whom switching between service and device has become second nature. Another defining result of this behaviour is the creation of niche networks and services. Content suggestion methods and algorithms have created siloed audiences, and audiences have responded positively to these changes.

For more insights on the impact of virtual reality and information on the proliferation of niche audiences, download the report.

Source: valnetinc.com / adweek.com; 4 Jan 2017

State Farm Is Targeting Location-Based Ads at Gas Stations

18,000 locations are getting equipped with digital screens

If you regularly fill your tank at a gas station, chances are you’ve spent a few minutes standing idly by your car. Now, advertisers want to serve you ads while you wait.

State Farm is running video ads on digital screens built into the pumps at 18,000 national gas stations as part of a partnership between Gas Station TV and payment company Verifone. The screens loop through a four- to five-minute segment featuring content from ESPN, CNN and Bloomberg that run alongside short national and local commercials from brands like State Farm. Each station’s screens can be customized to pull in either local or national content.

“State Farm has an interest in reaching the driving public,” said Edward Gold, advertising director at State Farm. “While we can do that on television and online video, when you have somebody who is actually driving a car, experiencing their car, taking care of their car and therefore thinking about their car, it’s a great opportunity for us.”

GSTV and Verifone claim their network of digital screens reaches one in three adults and 75 million unique monthly viewers. According to David Leider, president and CEO of Gas Station TV, 69 percent of that audience is between the ages of 18 and 49, a group of cord-cutting consumers who are increasingly watching video in ways other than linear TV. “We like to say that the audience is tied to that screen with a rubber hose for about five minutes—it’s a very captive, locked-down audience,” Leider said.

State Farm bought ads through GSTV in 2015 and ran a study through Lieberman Research in which 48 percent of respondents recalled seeing a State Farm ad, and 69 percent said they’d consider the company the next time they shopped for insurance.

State Farm’s Gold said the new work is part of a bigger plan to beef up the brand’s location-based advertising efforts, which also include piloting sponsored promos in online community platform Nextdoor.

“Local advertising is always something that we do, but then our ability to target people whether we know that they’re in a specific area—let’s say the northern suburb of Chicago—might be a little better market for us than the downtown area of Chicago,” Gold said. “Then when you start looking at location-based advertising opportunities, even from where the cell phone is at, and how we can target someone who has been standing on an auto dealership lot for five minutes, which means they’re either getting their car fixed or they’re shopping for a new car, we’re definitely getting more into very specific location-based opportunities.”

Source: adweek.com; 19 Apr 2017

Shell launches third edition of #StationStories in 2017

Shell has officially launched #StationStories 2017. The company premiered the story of Rasyidah and Zakiah it its latest edition to the series. Themed on friendship, the light-hearted story features two university students who are best friends for almost a decade.

Videos from the 2017 edition of #StationStories will be released periodically throughout the year.

The online video series features real stories of Malaysians and their unique journeys in life. Without scripts, castings, or actors, the series relies on the authentic stories of people who walk through Shell’s doors.

Watch the video here:

#StationStories was first launched in 2015. Following the success of its first edition, Shell took the web series to greater heights in 2016, featuring stories on progress and inspiration.

“Shell welcomes over 10 million people at its stations each week. We believe everyone has a unique story to tell, and #StationStories became a vehicle for us to reach out to our customers and share their stories as a source of inspiration to others. Over the years, #StationStories has allowed us to get to know our customers better and learn about their stories of respect, determination, care, love, and hope,” Ben Mahmud, head of retail marketing, Shell Malaysia, said

“#StationStories encouraged netizens to share their stories as well. The results of #StationStories have been overwhelming, and we’re heartened by the positive response. We hope to continue inspiring Malaysians with stories that highlight the diversity and common values of our country,” he added.

Source: marketing-interactive.com; 18 Apr 2017

Just Eat: voice technology will make your phone as good as a human

Voice input and artificial intelligence are close to being able to offer users an experience as seamless as visiting a restaurant, Just Eat’s chief product and technology officer said.

Fernando Fanton was speaking to an audience at 4YFN, the start-up spin-off of Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. He described Just Eat not as an app but a platform whose objective is to “reduce friction” and “open many more situations” for people to order food online.

He said: “One of the things we’re really excited about that we think will make a difference is voice interface.

“The problem of having to understand a particular way of communicating will fade away, and the experience will be as natural as going into a restaurant and asking a person, what should I eat today? We are not far away from that reality.”

He predicted that “material improvements” in voice interfaces would arrive this year or next – but added that the business was also looking at technological avenues including augmented and virtual reality.

Fanton used his speech to announce the launch of a start-up accelerator programme, running for 12 weeks from April, which aims to find partners to improve the business environment in a number of ways.

“We need to offer our restaurant partners an open ecosystem,” he said. “It’s not just about ecommerce, making a restaurant more profitable, but it’s about the entire world around us – what can we do to take care of food waste properly?”

Fanton acknowledged that this approach could lead to Just Eat bolstering its own potential rivals: “The true competition in this space is in the future – it hasn’t been invented yet.”

Source: campainglive.co.uk, 27 Feb 2017

Listen up! Why digital audio is set to experience a creative revolution

Ever noticed that everyone around you is always listening to something? And I’m not just talking about commuters with their headphones in. People are always listening. Whether that’s to another person, the radio or inconspicuous background noise, sound is one sense that we simply can’t switch off.

The hearing organs start forming when a foetus is just three weeks old. At around 25 weeks, a foetus uses sound to create new memory circuits with meaningful associations. At 36 weeks a foetus can tell the difference between different moods based on what it hears. From the womb until the moment we die we are inescapably surrounded by sound.

Strange then that with digital, the audio strategy falls to the back of advertisers’ priorities, especially when you think that nearly 22 million people spend around 11 hours every week listening to connected audio. Sound clearly plays a central role in our lives. And it should, so why not in marketing too?

Click here for full article & a second audio

Listen yourself (Headphones required)

Crimestoppers audio: Global worked with Crimestoppers to create an exhilarating 3D audio ad which placed the listener at the centre of a crime scene. The ad was produced to showcase the speed at which a crime scene can escalate and how contacting Crimestoppers can help avoid gun violence.

Source: campaignlive.co.uk; 10 Apr 2017