YouTube is now the most viewed video platform in APAC, barring China

With 45.5% digital video viewers, YouTube has been named as the most popular video viewing platform in APAC, according to eMarketer.

The number is further expected to rise by nearly 13%. The report named India as the fastest growing market with the viewership expected to rise from 203 million in 2018 to 285 million by 2021. Empowered by internet penetration, mobile phone video viewers in India will also rise to 204 million in 2021.

As for China, video platforms like Youku, Tencent, iQiyi, LeTV and Sohu—will have the highest penetration rate of internet users accessing their mobile phone to watch video in 2018, at an estimated 65.8%. Australia and Indonesia will also rank highly this year, with penetration rates of 62.9% and 61.7%, respectively.

Oscar Orozco, senior forecasting analyst at eMarketer, said: “YouTube usage is on the rise and has become the most popular video streaming service throughout Asia-Pacific, except in China where it is censored.

While regional Netflix adoption is still low, awareness and intent to subscribe is growing. We expect Netflix adoption will continue to expand, while at the same time providing much-needed competition and influence on local streaming providers.”

“Online video streaming is on the rise in Asia-Pacific; viewing is primarily occurring on mobile phones. In China, the availability of content has increased tenfold over the past year, with Baidu’s video platform iQiyi inking a content licensing deal with Netflix, while Alibaba’s Youku Tudou reached a similar agreement with NBCUniversal and Sony,” he added.

Source: thedrum.com; 31 Jan 2018

YouTube Is Finally Addressing Brand Safety Fears With These 3 Changes

Creators are getting new guidelines

After nearly a year of complaints from advertisers concerned about their ads appearing alongside questionable content and a slew of its biggest influencers going rogue on the platform, YouTube is revamping its policies for how creators make money off of their videos.

Over the past year, YouTube has tweaked several of its policies, upping the requirement for channels to hit 10,000 views, for example, and adding more staffers to vet videos. Still, brand safety has quickly become a more mainstream problem for brands. As of just last week at CES, execs were quick to point to brand safety concerns as among their biggest gripes with Google and Facebook.

“While we took several steps last year to protect advertisers from inappropriate content, we know we need to do more to ensure that their ads run alongside content that reflects their values,” wrote Paul Muret, vp of display, video and analytics at YouTube, in a blog post.

Here are the three steps YouTube is taking:

1. Buh-bye programmatic premium ads

Google Preferred, YouTube’s program that allows brands to only run ads against the most popular 5 percent of content, is billed as the site’s top-tier program for the its most premium content.

While those ad buys are limited to a small section of video channels, creators’ individual videos are not vetted. That can be a problem for brands: Think Logan Paul’s controversial “Suicide Forest” video that got the star kicked out of Google Preferred or PewDiePie’s anti-Semitic messages that caused brands to back away from his videos.

To avoid such problems, YouTube is now manually screening each individual video for Google Preferred channels, which should cut down on the number of lone videos that make their way through YouTube’s programmatic pipes. According to Google, Google Preferred channels and videos in the U.S. will be vetted by mid-February and will be finished globally by the end of March.

2. Moving beyond views

Until now, creators were given permission to be part of YouTube’s Partner Program—in other words, how people make money off of clips—based on how many views a channel had.

Although YouTube did increase the requirement to 10,000 total views in April, “it’s been clear over the last few months that we need the right requirements and better signals to identify the channels that have earned the right to run ads,” Muret wrote.

Now YouTube channels will need to amass 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of watch time in a one-year period to run ads. Both new and existing channels will have to meet the new requirements, which go into effect on Feb. 20.

In addition to views, YouTube staff will also monitor spam, community strikes and flags of abuse as qualifiers for whether or not a channel can make money off of clips.

According to Google, 99 percent of the channels that will be affected by the new guidelines make less than $100 from advertising every year, meaning the vast majority of channels affected do not make much money off of YouTube.

3. Tiered media buys

YouTube is rolling out a three-tiered system for brand safety that allows brands more transparency into where their ads appear.

One option caters to brands that are sensitive about where their ads appear. On the other end, a broad-based option lets brands buy ads across a bigger section of videos. The middle option—which is the default option—plays between, with targeted ads that still reach a significant number of channels.

Whether or not the changes will cause brands to pour more money and trust into Google has yet to be seen, but agencies see the moves as important steps from one of the world’s biggest advertising platforms.

Source: adweek.com; 17 Jan 2018

This chart shows how much more expensive ‘brand-safe’ video ads are versus YouTube videos

A number of global brands pulled their advertising campaigns from YouTube after finding their ads had appeared next to extremist content.

Google, which owns YouTube, has vowed to tackle the issue by working on toughening up its policies, making its advertiser controls easier to use, and hiring more staff to police content deemed unsafe by advertisers.

However, as this illustrative chart from Enders Analysis shows, at least some of the blame for such ad misplacement falls on the ad buyers themselves:

Image 1

The chart demonstrates that the cheapest ads – bought using automated systems on ad exchanges that serve ads to a swathe of sites across the web – carry the most risk, whereas ads that have been directly sold by a media owner – and particularly broadcasters – are deemed the most safe.

“YouTube Preferred” – a service where advertisers pay a premium to only appear against the most popular videos – also appears quite high up the chart. But most advertisers simply buy YouTube ads at scale, via ad exchanges like Google’s AdX.

As Google executives themselves explained, 400 hours of user-generated content are uploaded to YouTube every minute, making it extremely difficult to monitor which content is safe for brands to advertise against and which isn’t.

In a research note, Enders says: “The basic idea of ‘you get what you pay for’ in programmatic video advertising, either in media costs or agency planning and service fees (or both, depending on the type of media), is something we believe that many advertisers have yet to fully incorporate into their strategy for media buying.”

Business Insider took a deeper look at the real motivations behind the YouTube advertiser boycott. We spoke to more than a dozen ad executives who suggested the boycott smacks of “opportunism” and a chance to gleefully bash the biggest player in the online ad industry. Others said the disquiet shows just how little some marketers understand about the mechanics of the online advertising market.

Source: businessinsider.my; 25 Mar 2017

Amazon Eyes Video Advertising Expansion

Amazon is hoping to more aggressively take on Google and Facebook in the digital advertising space, and video advertising may play a key part of that expansion.

According to CNBC, Amazon hopes to increase its share of the search marketplace, as well as in video advertising, two areas where Google and Facebook are dominant.

An advertising technology executive who had spoken to the shopping giant about its video ad plans confirmed to Digital News Daily that Amazon was serious about making a play for video ad dollars, as well as expanding its video capabilities more generally.

Right now, Amazon sells video advertising for its simulcasts of NFL “Thursday Night Football Games,” though almost all of its Amazon Prime Video offerings remain ad-free.

Earlier this year, reports said Amazon had considered offering its Prime Video shows for free, supported by advertising, but the company denied that at the time.

Still, as Amazon expands its video offerings, including potential live sports and other programming, it could significantly increase its video ad inventory.

A more interesting opportunity for video advertising lies in the platforms the company controls. Amazon’s Echo Show and Fire TV products both serve over-the-top video to customers, and both could serve as a gateway for delivering video advertising.

The Fire TV stick was the number-two-selling product on Amazon this holiday season, the company said in a press release this week. Though Amazon declined to give any specific sales figures, eMarketer estimated that the company had approximately 36 million TV-connected devices in use as of July 2017, which suggests that it could have sold millions more devices this holiday season.

Just as Roku is leveraging its installation base to serve video ads, Amazon can do the same for Fire TV and Echo Show devices.

According to CNBC, Amazon is also pitching marketers on custom branded-content videos that it could run on its own platforms, or offer through ad marketplaces.

Despite its size, Amazon remains something of an underdog in the video advertising space. Google’s YouTube remains the 800-pound gorilla of free streaming video, while Facebook has invested heavily in its Watch platform to grow its video business.

Source: mediapost.com; 28 Dec 2017

Like 6-second ads, this will only take a few seconds…

Shorter ads won’t fix the problem with low-quality ads.

Just like the current trend in creating six-second TV spots, this will be brief.

Everyone’s heard about six-second ads. OK. They make sense—to a degree. I get it. The TV networks can sell more ads in a 30 second pod. It’s a way to maximize time, and there’s a justifiable argument for it—consumers online don’t watch content longer that 10 seconds. Those annoying lead-in ads on YouTube only get five seconds of play. Our world has a shortened attention span, probably brought on by millennials.

But I believe there’s another reason why no one watches more than five seconds of TV or video ads. Maybe, just maybe, it’s because the ads stink. There, I said it. In my opinion, the vast majority of video ads are terrible. Not interesting. Not engaging. Not clever. Not informative. Not entertaining. (I actually wanted to say that 99 percent of all advertising is crap, but my PR guy wouldn’t let me.)

The cynics out there will no doubt push back and indict me for being an old geezer dribbling on and on and offering nothing more than a clichéd argument that everyone’s heard before. Maybe so.

But let me ask you this: Why is it that we won’t watch more than a few seconds of an ad but will gladly spend six hours a night binge-watching “Broadchurch”—and still want more? (By the way, season two is much better than season one).

It’s not impossible to make ads that are just as rewarding as our favourite long-form entertainment programs. The Super Bowl is a good example. As a society, we watch those ads and talk about them as much as we talk about the game itself. Maybe more. Why? Because they’re good. They reward us for watching them. They’re fun. They’re entertaining. They’re interesting. They’re well made.

And that is precisely my point. It’s not about length—it’s about quality. It’s about professionalism. It’s about caring enough to do the very best work we can possibly do. We have to make sure we reward the viewer. It doesn’t matter if it’s six seconds, 30 seconds, one minute, 60 minutes or two hours. There must be a carrot at the end of the stick.

Are you still reading? Just checking. Someone once told me nobody reads articles longer than 250 words. This one clocks in at 401. Hope I didn’t overstay my welcome.

Matt Smith is Founder-CEO of US ad agency SmithGifford, which has offices in Philadelphia and Washington, DC.

Source: campaignasia.com; 8 Dec 2017

YouTube courts advertisers with promise of better targeting

YouTube wants to make it easier for brands to serve up more relevant and personalised ads and measure their offline impact.

YouTube is launching a range of new tools for advertisers as it looks to convince more marketers to spend their budgets on the video platform and put the brand safety controversy behind it.  It is courting brands with updates that it claims will make advertising on the platform more relevant and personalised, and make it easier to measure their offline impact.

“This is going to make it easier for brands to have even more relevant and personalised campaigns that really match the intentions of users. That will continue to grow the impact of the advertising on their platform because it gives people a better experience,” Tara Walpert Levy, vice president of agency and media solutions at Google, tells Marketing Week.

The first update brings ‘Custom Affinity Audiences’ to YouTube, meaning brands can use intent signals from search or the types of apps users have downloaded to make their video ads more effective. So, for example, a consumer that searches for local ski resorts could see an ad for ski clothes on YouTube. It claims that in tests the change drove 20% higher ad recall and 50% higher brand awareness.

Two of the launches relate to making it easier to develop creative for YouTube. The ‘Director Mix’ tool aims to make it simpler for brands to create hundreds of different pieces of creative that can be personalised to a particular consumer or the content they are watching.

It lets marketers upload multiple aspects of an ad – for example different footage, copy or voiceovers – and the tool will then create the ads.

The second tool enables video ad sequencing, so a brand can show a viewer three different ads in a particular order to build a story over time and increase the frequency they might see a brand without “annoying people”.

And lastly, YouTube is hoping to make it easier for brands to measure the offline impact of advertising on the video platform using Nielsen MPA (matched panel analysis).

Walpert Levy adds: “We want to focus people on the fact that it is intention and understanding that intention, and delivering a message against intention, that drives attention and results.”

YouTube has had a difficult year, with its standing among advertisers taking a hit following the brand safety scandal and the decision by a number of brands to pull advertising. However, Walpert Levy says most marketers have been “really happy” with the “proactive” steps YouTube has taken to address their concerns.

Yet she admits there is “always more to do”. She thinks that while YouTube is “leading the market” in areas such as viewability, there is still more it can do to ensure advertising is not shown next to egregious content.

“The question of how you ensure every brand is on exactly the content that they want to be on is a continuous process, because every brand has a different version of that and the amount of content out there is more than ever before. We’ve made huge progress and had great feedback on that progress but we know there’s a lot more room to go,” she says.

Source: marketingweek.com; 25 Sep 2017

Millennials mostly watch TV after it’s aired

Older people still watch more live TV, but that’s changing.

Millennials don’t watch live TV most of the time. People aged 18-34 spend 55 percent of their video-watching time consuming content after it has already aired on live TV, according to a new study from the Consumer Technology Association. Only 45 percent of that time is spent with live television.

Of the video millennials do watch, 35 percent comes from streaming services like Netflix or on-demand video from a pay TV. They spend 20 percent of their viewing time watching recorded shows off their DVR.

The switch to time-shifted TV puts further pressure on TV networks that are struggling to make their shows attractive to advertisers and retain audiences — audiences that are increasingly seeking out entertainment elsewhere, such as on Snapchat and Facebook. That’s one of the key reasons why advertisers still pay a lot of money to be next to sports content like the NFL despite its flattening audience: Sports still compel people to watch live.

People older than 35 do spend a majority of their viewing time, or 66 percent, with live TV.

Image 1

But even so, live TV has been losing ground across all demographics. The share of consumers who watch live TV at least once a week, according to the CTA study, has shrunk from 92 percent in 2014 to 80 percent in 2017.

That viewing time has been supplanted by an increase in TV watching through paid and free websites as well as network websites and apps.

Image 2

Source: recode.net; 9 Sep 2017

3 Trends on YouTube That Prove Gaming Culture Isn’t So Niche

Whether you’ve noticed it or not, gaming is deeply ingrained in pop culture today: Game tunes are showing up in electronic music, workout classes are getting “gamified,” and Hollywood is rolling out the red carpet for movies about games like “Ready Player One.”

Gaming has gone mainstream—so much so that, according to gaming trends analyst Newzoo, it’s one of the most-watched content categories on YouTube today.1

This presents a big opportunity for brands, game-related or not. Gamers are a highly engaged and influential audience on YouTube. But what are they tuning into? What is gaming content all about?

You may think gaming content is niche, but it’s not that different from other content people are watching on YouTube—like competitive sports, how-to, and unboxing videos.

Click here for full article

Source: thinkwithgoogle.com; June 2017

Marketing to Gen Xers? Here’s What They’re Watching on YouTube

Generation X, born between the mid-1960s and late ’70s, bore witness to the technology revolution. Its members are old enough to remember a time before the internet, but young enough to have adapted quickly to the changing technological landscape.

The incentive for brands to engage this generation on YouTube is, in a word, massive. According to Pixability, Gen Xers account for over 1.5B views every day on YouTube.1

To better understand Gen Xers’ priorities relative to their YouTube engagement, Google conducted qualitative and survey-based research in partnership with Ipsos Connect and Flamingo.2

The findings? Gen Xers’ behaviour on YouTube reflects broadly held assumptions about the generation: their ability to self-start, their love for nostalgia, and their desire to be in the know, just to name a few traits.

Below, check out the stats behind the YouTube behaviour of Gen Xers.

Click here for more on the research article

Source: thinkwithgoogle.com; Jan 2017

Shell launches third edition of #StationStories in 2017

Shell has officially launched #StationStories 2017. The company premiered the story of Rasyidah and Zakiah it its latest edition to the series. Themed on friendship, the light-hearted story features two university students who are best friends for almost a decade.

Videos from the 2017 edition of #StationStories will be released periodically throughout the year.

The online video series features real stories of Malaysians and their unique journeys in life. Without scripts, castings, or actors, the series relies on the authentic stories of people who walk through Shell’s doors.

Watch the video here:

#StationStories was first launched in 2015. Following the success of its first edition, Shell took the web series to greater heights in 2016, featuring stories on progress and inspiration.

“Shell welcomes over 10 million people at its stations each week. We believe everyone has a unique story to tell, and #StationStories became a vehicle for us to reach out to our customers and share their stories as a source of inspiration to others. Over the years, #StationStories has allowed us to get to know our customers better and learn about their stories of respect, determination, care, love, and hope,” Ben Mahmud, head of retail marketing, Shell Malaysia, said

“#StationStories encouraged netizens to share their stories as well. The results of #StationStories have been overwhelming, and we’re heartened by the positive response. We hope to continue inspiring Malaysians with stories that highlight the diversity and common values of our country,” he added.

Source: marketing-interactive.com; 18 Apr 2017