YouTube courts advertisers with promise of better targeting

YouTube wants to make it easier for brands to serve up more relevant and personalised ads and measure their offline impact.

YouTube is launching a range of new tools for advertisers as it looks to convince more marketers to spend their budgets on the video platform and put the brand safety controversy behind it.  It is courting brands with updates that it claims will make advertising on the platform more relevant and personalised, and make it easier to measure their offline impact.

“This is going to make it easier for brands to have even more relevant and personalised campaigns that really match the intentions of users. That will continue to grow the impact of the advertising on their platform because it gives people a better experience,” Tara Walpert Levy, vice president of agency and media solutions at Google, tells Marketing Week.

The first update brings ‘Custom Affinity Audiences’ to YouTube, meaning brands can use intent signals from search or the types of apps users have downloaded to make their video ads more effective. So, for example, a consumer that searches for local ski resorts could see an ad for ski clothes on YouTube. It claims that in tests the change drove 20% higher ad recall and 50% higher brand awareness.

Two of the launches relate to making it easier to develop creative for YouTube. The ‘Director Mix’ tool aims to make it simpler for brands to create hundreds of different pieces of creative that can be personalised to a particular consumer or the content they are watching.

It lets marketers upload multiple aspects of an ad – for example different footage, copy or voiceovers – and the tool will then create the ads.

The second tool enables video ad sequencing, so a brand can show a viewer three different ads in a particular order to build a story over time and increase the frequency they might see a brand without “annoying people”.

And lastly, YouTube is hoping to make it easier for brands to measure the offline impact of advertising on the video platform using Nielsen MPA (matched panel analysis).

Walpert Levy adds: “We want to focus people on the fact that it is intention and understanding that intention, and delivering a message against intention, that drives attention and results.”

YouTube has had a difficult year, with its standing among advertisers taking a hit following the brand safety scandal and the decision by a number of brands to pull advertising. However, Walpert Levy says most marketers have been “really happy” with the “proactive” steps YouTube has taken to address their concerns.

Yet she admits there is “always more to do”. She thinks that while YouTube is “leading the market” in areas such as viewability, there is still more it can do to ensure advertising is not shown next to egregious content.

“The question of how you ensure every brand is on exactly the content that they want to be on is a continuous process, because every brand has a different version of that and the amount of content out there is more than ever before. We’ve made huge progress and had great feedback on that progress but we know there’s a lot more room to go,” she says.

Source: marketingweek.com; 25 Sep 2017

Millennials mostly watch TV after it’s aired

Older people still watch more live TV, but that’s changing.

Millennials don’t watch live TV most of the time. People aged 18-34 spend 55 percent of their video-watching time consuming content after it has already aired on live TV, according to a new study from the Consumer Technology Association. Only 45 percent of that time is spent with live television.

Of the video millennials do watch, 35 percent comes from streaming services like Netflix or on-demand video from a pay TV. They spend 20 percent of their viewing time watching recorded shows off their DVR.

The switch to time-shifted TV puts further pressure on TV networks that are struggling to make their shows attractive to advertisers and retain audiences — audiences that are increasingly seeking out entertainment elsewhere, such as on Snapchat and Facebook. That’s one of the key reasons why advertisers still pay a lot of money to be next to sports content like the NFL despite its flattening audience: Sports still compel people to watch live.

People older than 35 do spend a majority of their viewing time, or 66 percent, with live TV.

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But even so, live TV has been losing ground across all demographics. The share of consumers who watch live TV at least once a week, according to the CTA study, has shrunk from 92 percent in 2014 to 80 percent in 2017.

That viewing time has been supplanted by an increase in TV watching through paid and free websites as well as network websites and apps.

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Source: recode.net; 9 Sep 2017

3 Trends on YouTube That Prove Gaming Culture Isn’t So Niche

Whether you’ve noticed it or not, gaming is deeply ingrained in pop culture today: Game tunes are showing up in electronic music, workout classes are getting “gamified,” and Hollywood is rolling out the red carpet for movies about games like “Ready Player One.”

Gaming has gone mainstream—so much so that, according to gaming trends analyst Newzoo, it’s one of the most-watched content categories on YouTube today.1

This presents a big opportunity for brands, game-related or not. Gamers are a highly engaged and influential audience on YouTube. But what are they tuning into? What is gaming content all about?

You may think gaming content is niche, but it’s not that different from other content people are watching on YouTube—like competitive sports, how-to, and unboxing videos.

Click here for full article

Source: thinkwithgoogle.com; June 2017

Marketing to Gen Xers? Here’s What They’re Watching on YouTube

Generation X, born between the mid-1960s and late ’70s, bore witness to the technology revolution. Its members are old enough to remember a time before the internet, but young enough to have adapted quickly to the changing technological landscape.

The incentive for brands to engage this generation on YouTube is, in a word, massive. According to Pixability, Gen Xers account for over 1.5B views every day on YouTube.1

To better understand Gen Xers’ priorities relative to their YouTube engagement, Google conducted qualitative and survey-based research in partnership with Ipsos Connect and Flamingo.2

The findings? Gen Xers’ behaviour on YouTube reflects broadly held assumptions about the generation: their ability to self-start, their love for nostalgia, and their desire to be in the know, just to name a few traits.

Below, check out the stats behind the YouTube behaviour of Gen Xers.

Click here for more on the research article

Source: thinkwithgoogle.com; Jan 2017

Shell launches third edition of #StationStories in 2017

Shell has officially launched #StationStories 2017. The company premiered the story of Rasyidah and Zakiah it its latest edition to the series. Themed on friendship, the light-hearted story features two university students who are best friends for almost a decade.

Videos from the 2017 edition of #StationStories will be released periodically throughout the year.

The online video series features real stories of Malaysians and their unique journeys in life. Without scripts, castings, or actors, the series relies on the authentic stories of people who walk through Shell’s doors.

Watch the video here:

#StationStories was first launched in 2015. Following the success of its first edition, Shell took the web series to greater heights in 2016, featuring stories on progress and inspiration.

“Shell welcomes over 10 million people at its stations each week. We believe everyone has a unique story to tell, and #StationStories became a vehicle for us to reach out to our customers and share their stories as a source of inspiration to others. Over the years, #StationStories has allowed us to get to know our customers better and learn about their stories of respect, determination, care, love, and hope,” Ben Mahmud, head of retail marketing, Shell Malaysia, said

“#StationStories encouraged netizens to share their stories as well. The results of #StationStories have been overwhelming, and we’re heartened by the positive response. We hope to continue inspiring Malaysians with stories that highlight the diversity and common values of our country,” he added.

Source: marketing-interactive.com; 18 Apr 2017

Why mobile video is massive and other lessons from Mobile World Congress 2017

Forget 5G, connected cars, virtual reality and waterproof phones; the most important trend at Mobile World Congress was mobile video.

How do we know? Look at the keynote speakers: the top dogs from Turner, Vice, Netflix and Discovery were all in town.

On other stages numerous TV networks, media and social media companies, as well as the biggest brands, e.g. Shell, Red Bull and Lufthansa, were talking up mobile video.

Why are these media bosses doing keynotes in Barcelona? Partly they are looking for new distribution networks for their own video content, such as Netflix. But mostly they are wooing brands to the lucrative branded/sponsored video market.

If video is the new mobile (Facebook CEO Zuckerberg told shareholders in February 2017 that the company was going “video-first” because “video is a megatrend on the same order as mobile”), then mobile video is the giant honeypot.

And publishers, broadcasters, social media, content creators and creative/digital agencies are swarming all over it.

…The highlight of Shell’s multi-platform #makethefuture campaign is a music video entitled ‘Best Day of My Life’ that showcases six artists and six alternative energy ideas from young innovators, which has racked up 48 million views on YouTube in five months.

If branded content can achieve stats like that, it’s no wonder brands are falling in love with video.

Click here for full article

Source: clickz.com, 15 Mar 2017

How video storytelling and mobile have transformed Shell’s corporate marketing

Shell’s global corporate marketing has shifted entirely from one dominated by traditional media (i.e. TV and print advertising) and brand messages to one dominated by digital media and video-led storytelling.

And the stories it tells are no longer about Shell the company, they’re about the alternative energy start-ups it helps.

Malena Cutuli Group Head of Integrated Brand Communications & Capability at Shell talked to Andy Favell for ClickZ at Mobile World Congress 2017’s Modern Marketing Summit:

“Six years ago, when I joined the company, Shell’s global corporate marketing was 80% traditional communications and now we are doing 85% digital and content creation and 15% traditional. And that is for countries where digital is not easy to find, such as in Africa.”
The Shell corporate marketing team hasn’t run a TV ad for four years, with the exception of in China, where the last TV ad ran two years ago.

That doesn’t mean you won’t see a Shell ad on TV. TV advertising is still used by the retail marketing team (which is separate to Malena Cutuli’s brand communications group), to help sell Shell’s products – but you won’t see TV ads about Shell the company.

Click here for full report

Source: clickz.com, 20 Mar 2017

Amazon Raises Ad Stakes With Video Advertising

With little fanfare, Amazon Video Ads (AVA) rolled out this week to advertisers working with the Amazon Media Group (AMG).

The new out-stream video advertising product allows advertisers to run an autoplay feature in videos as shoppers browse on the Amazon platform across desktop, tablets and smartphones. The ads are muted by default. With a click, site visitors can choose to view the ads in full-screen mode and listen to them.

Amazon engineers developed the video ads to follow Media Rating Council (MRC) and Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) standards, which means that at least 50% of the advertisement must remain in view for 2 consecutive seconds. The autoplay feature starts only when the ad is in view, and it automatically pauses when the ad goes out of view.

The company reports that based on early tests, the video ad and placement performs best in the first five seconds of play, with the optimal length of the video advertisement at 15 seconds or less. It’s all about driving down the cost of video views across the marketplace.

While Amazon Video Ads are not available today for placement outside of the marketplace, building out a network isn’t beyond the realm of possibilities. The company has been running Google Shopping Ads.

Amazon Video Ads are being offered in a variety of countries such as the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Japan, Germany, and Spain.

The expansion of Amazon’s advertising platform and cloud services through Amazon Web Services (AWS) has helped founder Jeff Bezos and company catch the attention of executives at some of the largest and most successful advertising holding companies, agencies and brands. Making good business decisions has made his pockets a little deeper, enabling the billionaire to expand his empire. In fact, Forbes reports that Bezos added $20 billion to his net worth over 14 months through December 2016 — the largest gain of anyone in the world.

Source: mediapost.com, 10 Mar 2017