Tencent reported to consolidate 3 content business groups

Tencent is consolidating three content business groups to form one unit, as well as create a new unit for cloud and smart industries, according to multiple media reports including Reuters, Nikkei Asian Review and the Wall Street Journal.

The company will also further explore the integration of social, content and technology that is “more suitable” for future trends. Media reports stated that the gaming and social media firm is also looking to promote the upgrade from consumer internet to industrial internet. A technology committee will be formed to strengthen Tencent’s research and development, as well as promote collaboration and innovation.

WSJ reported that online media and mobile internet are among the content business groups that will be consolidated, while video games will continue to operate under the interactive entertainment group.

The move is seen as a bid to boost its cloud-based data offering services for corporate clients, an area which is dominated by Alibaba Group in China. The restructure also aims to improve Tencent’s content offering for various services such as WeChat, games and music.

Tencent’s spokesperson confirmed to Marketing that there will be no layoffs.

The company posted a revenue of RMB73,675 million for the second quarter of its financial year ended 30 June 2018 (Q2 2018), representing a 30% year-on-year increase. This was driven primarily by payment-related services, digital content subscriptions and sales, social and others advertising, and smartphone games.

Its online advertising business saw a 39% increase to RMB14,110 million Q2 2018. Social and others advertising revenues increased by 55% to RMB9,380 million, due to its mobile advertising network and Weixin and QQ KanDian. Media advertising revenues grew by 16% to RMB4,730 million. The growth mainly reflected greater contributions from Tencent Video as a result of its content portfolio and advertisers’ sponsorship campaigns.

Meanwhile, social networks revenue increased by 30% to RMB16,867 million, driven by higher contributions from digital content services such as video streaming subscriptions and live broadcast services.

Revenue from Tencent’s value-added services business increased by 14% to RMB42,069 million for Q2 2018. Online games revenue increased by 6% to RMB25,202 million, due to growth in revenues from smartphone games such as Honour of Kings and QQ Speed Mobile.

Source: marketing-interactive.com; 1 Oct 2018

“Indians consuming more mobile data than US and China combined”: Rajan Anandan, Google

The Google India chief was speaking at the annual AAAI Subhas Ghosal memorial lecture 2018 in Mumbai last evening

“India is at an incredible place when it comes to the digital economy,” said Rajan Anandan, VP Google India and South East Asia as he opened his address to a gathering of senior advertising executives at the AAAI Subhas Ghosal memorial lecture 2018.

Speaking about the behaviour of “The new Indian internet user” Anandan added that most of the new users are accessing the Internet on their phone pointing out that 70 percent of phones shipped into India have a 2 GB RAM or more. Despite the acute affordability constraints, phones are getting better and better, he said.

He said that the large scale consumption of data is driven by affordability. The street price per GB of data has come down from 3 USD to 30 Cents in India leading to an 18x growth in the internet consumption.

Indians were consuming 8 GB of data per month compared to developed markets like the UK where the average user consumption was still at 3 GB. He added that India was consuming more mobile data than US and China combined. “The affordable mobile data constraint is solved now.”

Anandan said the major development was that most of the new users were consuming the internet in their local language. He said when the new internet users were also setting new trends as there had been a 270 percent growth in voice searches and a 400 per cent increase in Hindi voice searches over the internet over the last 12 months. “There has been an explosive growth of voice,” he said.

According to him, Internet usage behaviour had leapfrogged from message first to video first, and said that the time spent on video versus social had shifted largely in favour of video. “Data is cheap and video is intuitive,” he said.

He added that the growing adoption of e commerce and payments would result in an increase in transactions from USD 2 Bn or 2 percent of total retail in 2017 to 200 Bn in 2025.

However, he points out that the 95 MN internet shoppers in India only spent an average of 224 USD compared to USD 1850 spends by Chinese Internet shoppers per year. He said that over 50 million Indians had tried e-commerce once, but never bought again suggesting that players need to increase their service levels significantly.

Anandan added that digital payments volumes growing rapidly driven by UPI. He said that the potential was a Trillion dollars over the next five years.

Highlighting the advantages for India in an AI first world, he said that AI start-ups were driving growth across sectors, citing the examples of Niramai and sig tuple in medical diagnostics or byju in learning.

He ended by saying that the key sectors that would be transformed by the Internet included, agricultural, financial inclusion, public transportation, education and healthcare. “The real need is to solve for India,” he said.

Source: campaignindia.in; 21 Sep 2018

What Types of Data Will GDPR Impact Most?

There are a few kinds of data that are most susceptible to the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In a Q3 2018 survey of 227 senior marketing executives worldwide conducted by CMO Council and SAP, 54% of respondents said they anticipate that they’ll no longer be able to use behavioral data like web browsing data and search histories if they want to stay compliant with the GDPR. About half indicated that third-party data and email addresses may not be safe to use under GDPR.

What Types of Personal Customer Data Do Senior Marketing Executives Worldwide Expect to Use Less Often as Part of GDPR Compliance? Q3 2018 (% of respondents)

What Types of Personal Customer Data Do Senior Marketing Executives Worldwide Expect to Use Less Often as Part of GDPR Compliance? Q3 2018 (% of respondents)
The GDPR went live in May and states that people’s data can only be used if they give a company explicit permission. Companies found to be in violation of the GDPR face a fine of €20 million ($22.1 million) or 4% of global revenues (whichever is greater).

To comply with the GDPR, Google made it easier for people to delete their search and browsing data. Another reason why behavioral targeting may be less reliable under GDPR is that many companies collecting behavioral data have not obtained user consent to do so.

Using behavioral data to serve a single ad to a user often involves dozens of tech vendors. Most users aren’t aware of the many vendors that process their data. If regulators are strict about forcing these behind-the-scenes companies to obtain user consent, then targeting ads with behavioral data becomes more of an uphill battle for marketers. Like so many other possible outcomes regarding the GDPR, the future reliability of behavioral data will come down to how regulators choose to act.

Source: emarketer.com; 7 Sep 2018

Malaysia heads for high-income status

Solid GDP growth is moving Malaysians up the spending-power ladder.

According to the World Bank, Malaysia is one of the most open economies in the world, with a trade- to GDP ratio averaging over 140 percent since 2010. It’s openness to trade and investment has been instrumental in creating employment opportunities and income growth. In 2017, Malaysia proudly increased its ranking in the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness report to rank 25th out of 138 economies, leading the region of emerging economies. Malaysia aspires to achieve status as a high-income economy by 2020 as classified by the World Bank and as a result has been focusing on efforts to attract investments and drive productivity and innovation through political, economic and regulatory reforms.

In Q4 2017, the Malaysian economy expanded by 4.9%, continuing the strong momentum shown throughout the year. Headline inflation moderated to 3.5% in Q4 2017, mainly due to lower inflation in the housing, water, electricity and gas as well as transport categories. The central bank expects GDP growth to remain favourable in 2018, with moderate inflation coming from domestic demand, continued export growth from encouraging global demand conditions and the stronger Ringgit.

While the economy expanded in Q4 2017, consumer confidence has remained stable throughout the year. The economy continued to be the top concern for Malaysian consumers during this period, reflected by subdued consumer spending. On the FMCG front, the market hit an all-time high for the year in Q4 2017 after subdued performance over the festive periods in Q1 and Q2 2017. Modern Trade growth has come via Super/ Minimarket and Convenience store format expansion in line with the growing propensity for Malaysian consumers to shop at stores that are ‘convenient to get to’ and shops that offer low prices for most items. It is these attributes that appeal most to consumers’ changing lifestyle needs, which are driving the expansion of smaller store formats.

The digital landscape is changing the way Malaysians interact with each other, how they form their opinions and how they make purchase decisions. It is an exciting time for Malaysian media, as digital media continues to grow and traditional media innovates to keep pace and stay relevant. Increased internet usage has also positively impacted Malaysia’s e-commerce industry. Among the 17.4 million Malaysians aged 15 and above, 10% have shopped for products or services online past month. Online shoppers tend to be younger (the majority are under the age of 39), and among the most affluent (with a household income of more than RM8000) online shopping rises to a healthy 25%.

The rise of digital media, however, does not mean that traditional media is no longer relevant in Malaysia. Nielsen Consumer and Media View shows that in 2017, daily newspapers, television, radio, outdoor advertising and in-store media continued to enjoy more than 70% reach across the board.

In this environment, it is critical to embrace both traditional and new channels and formats to ensure consumers receive a consistent brand proposition across both physical and digital mediums. Authenticity and transparency are central in this highly connected world, where consumers can quickly verify claims and check price comparisons at the click of a button.

Source: campaignasia.com; 27 Aug 2018

We’re spending more time with Google than ever. Is it time to ditch Facebook?

A recent study shows that consumers are spending more time with Google than ever before, while digital consumption of Facebook is down. Should advertisers jump ship as well?

Google and Facebook have made the headlines so frequently in recent days that news about them is beginning to sound more like salacious celebrity gossip than reports about tech companies. In fact, one recent headline claims that “Google consumes one-third of our digital minds.”

The headline was inspired by a study by Brian Wieser, a researcher at Pivotal, that found consumers spent 34.2% of their time online in June using Google products, including Waze and YouTube. That number is up from 28.6% last year.

The study also suggested that the increased time spent on Google could be cutting into time spent on Facebook, since digital consumption of Facebook dropped 10%, and consumption of Instagram (a Facebook company) dropped 6%.

If consumers are no longer spending as much time on Facebook and have migrated to Google, should advertisers follow suite?

Right on the heels of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which the data of 87 million Facebook users was accessed in an attempt to sway the U.S. presidential election, the company was hit with billions in fines for failure to comply with new EU privacy rules. Then, a month after the GDPR took effect, it was announced that Facebook’s stock dropped 20%, losing $120 billion in value.

And most important for marketers, Facebook ads are getting more expensive, yet people seem to be less receptive. Merkle, a performance marketing agency, recently found that the cost of advertising on Facebook in Q2 has risen 70%. But advertisers may not be getting what they pay for, since the company also found that impressions were down 17% for the same period.

Google ads, on the other hand, are doing better than ever. Merkle also found that Google shopping ads were up 31%, while YouTube ad spend grew an explosive 189%. Google also accounted for 96% of organic search visits.

And while Google has also faced its share of scandals lately, including its own set of EU fines and user concerns about privacy, that doesn’t seem to be slowing down the amount of time consumers are willing to spend with the company.

So as Facebook struggles to shake its less than stellar reputation, should advertisers be moving to greener pastures?

Back in January, Mark Zuckerberg himself told advertisers that changes to the site may cause users to spend less time on the platform, resulting in less opportunities for reach with both paid and organic ads.

And while the drop in time spent on the platform, not to mention the soaring cost of advertising, may seem scary, according to Andy Taylor, associate director of research for Merkle, they’re not as dire as they seem. While impressions are down, users are clicking more than ever. Over the same period that saw a decline in impressions, total ad clicks actually increased by 20%, indicating that users are actually more interested in ads now that they’re spending less time looking at them.

According to Taylor, the soaring price of advertisements is a result of companies clamouring to be included in a limited space.

“Google makes changes by adding inventory and expanding ads. But for Facebook, there are only so many spots you can throw ads on a page.”

Expanded inventory could be coming soon

If Facebook is going to continue to grow ad revenue, it’s going to have to find a way to offer more inventory. Instagram is one channel Facebook is exploring to increase opportunities for advertisers. And while advertising on Instagram is still in a nascent stage – with mixed opinions on how much space they should fill – the popularity of the platform, which recently grew to 1 billion users, and it’s newish Stories feature provides ample opportunity for advertisers looking to experiment.

Facebook has also announced plans to focus on a “family-wide audience metric,” that unifies advertiser campaigns across all its platforms, including WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger.

And though it’s more expensive to advertise on Facebook than ever before, Taylor isn’t advising his clients to leave the platform.

“I don’t see advertisers fleeing from Facebook for Google,” Taylor says, “and I expect to see Facebook grow in a meaningful way over the next few quarters.

Yet Taylor also isn’t telling his clients to avoid Google. In fact, quite the opposite. While many articles and studies depict Facebook and Google as an either/or proposition, a healthy campaign should probably include both.

“It’s really about what you can afford,” Taylor says. “But the goal is to be visible on as many platforms as possible.”

Source: clickz.com; 17 Aug 2018

Google highlighted the Assistant at I/O 2018

At its annual I/O developer conference, Google made several announcements related to its voice assistant, Google Assistant, that aim to spur adoption of the technology. The biggest updates circle around improving natural interactions and adding a visual component.

Google is enabling more natural interactions with the Assistant aimed to bolster usage of the platform with four key additions:

– Google introduced a Continued Conversation feature. Continued Conversation allows Google Assistant users to ask multiple questions in succession without having to repeat the “Hey, Google” wake-up word for each command. This feature, which should be available in the coming weeks, is similar to Amazon Alexa’s Follow-Up Mode.

– Google launched the ability to create custom Routines. Google rolled out Routines in March 2018 to enable users to manage their connected devices with just a single voice command to Google Assistant, but it was limited to only six pre-programmed Routines. Allowing for customization of Google Assistant Routines could make the platform more useful for consumers, and puts it on par with Alexa.

– Google rolled out a Multiple Actions feature. The Multiple Actions feature allows users to make multiple requests in one voice command. Now Google Assistant will be able to listen to a string of commands within 8 seconds of the initial command. The new feature will improve the speed of the Assistant’s responses, as users no longer have to wait for a second, or third, response.

– Google Assistant now supports six new voices. This brings the total number of voices the Assistant supports to eight — previously, Google Assistant let its users pick between just one female and one male voice. The new voices are built with machine learning technology called WaveNet, which is DeepMind’s model for creating natural-sounding speech. WaveNet also powers Google’s Cloud Text-to-Speech platform.

Google Assistant is also becoming visually assistive. Google unveiled a new experience for Google Assistant that brings up visual information as well as new ways to interact with apps such as those for smart home products. When a user makes a Google Assistant voice request, the assistant will provide a more interactive visual, full-screen experience. For instance, when asking Google Assistant to turn down the heat, a display will show up on the phone with a way to adjust the temperature.

The Google Assistant-powered smart speakers with screen displays will launch in July, with partners including Lenovo, LG, Sony, and Harman via JBL. Smart display speakers can perform all the same functions as smart speakers, but they also offer the ability for users to make video calls, watch videos, look at photos, and search the internet, using both their voice and hands. They also serve as a funnel to bring consumers to YouTube, particularly in areas like the kitchen, where a hands-free, voice-controlled screen could be useful for instructional videos, for example.

The latest announcements could be key in helping Google bolster its voice assistant platform. Google’s emphasis on making the overall Google Assistant experience more conversational and visually assertive will likely fuel engagement on the platform.

As Google Assistant becomes more intelligent and allows for a more natural interaction, and developers create better and more useful ways to integrate them with consumers’ lives, the Assistant will cement itself as the primary way consumers interact with their devices.

Advancements in a bevy of industries are helping intelligent digital voice assistants like Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa become more sophisticated and useful pieces of technology.

Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) are allowing them to accurately understand more information, while upgrades to mobile networks are facilitating quick transfers of data to robust clouds, enabling fast response times. In addition, the swell of internet connected devices like smart thermostats and speakers is giving voice assistants more utility in a connected consumer’s life.

However, there are still numerous barriers that need to be overcome before this product platform will see mass adoption, as both technological challenges and societal hurdles persist.

Source: businessinsider.com; 9 May 2018

Brands in non-EU countries should adopt GDPR rules, study finds

Publishers are being too slow to adopt consent management platforms, which will cause growing pains for programmatic advertising when the new regulation comes into force.

The majority of consumers in non-EU countries would like at least one of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules to be in effect in their country, a study has revealed.

Research carried out by video ad tech company Unruly, which spoke with 4,000 people across eight markets about the incoming changes to the way data is handled by firms, also found that 63% of consumers worldwide trust brands more when they are clear about how and where their data is used.

“There’s a lot of trust that needs to be built between brands and consumers globally, not just in the EU,” said Kenneth Suh, chief operating officer at Unruly. “They really need to be providing some clarity around the data and the purposes it’s being used for.

“This is all really great news for users. It’s an opportunity to get a much clearer picture and understanding of who’s collecting your data and how it’s being used.”

The new law kicks in on May 25 and applies to all EU citizens, but even companies in the US or China have to follow the rules if dealing with EU citizens.

Among the changes include that future requests for consent of data sharing can’t be hidden under reams of Ts and Cs — they have to be clearly distinguished. Pre-ticked boxes can no longer be used to indicate consent, and making people hand over more personal information in exchange for extra features is also not allowed.

Only 58% of those surveyed in the UK had heard of GDPR, and 26% in the US

But when asked, 93% of all consumers in non-EU countries said they would like at least one rule brought about by GDPR effective in their country.

Among the top areas of importance, people agreed with the three following statements: I should have the right to see a copy of my personal data at any time; I should have the right to ask how my data is being used at any time and; I should have the right to delete the data companies have collected about me.

The research found that people are most comfortable sharing biometric data for services like fitness apps because the rewards for exchange of data are clear and obvious — you get to learn about your health.

In an age of fake news, brands and advertisers must strive to voice a message of trust and transparency, stressed Suh.

However, using social media to project this message may hinder the goal. The study found that 43% of people worldwide say their trust in advertising on social media has dropped significantly in the last few months — 43% in the US, 51% in the UK

“You can think about the conundrum brands have around social media platforms as a way to reach audiences,” said Suh. “We know that reach is on the social media side, but if more than half of the information you’re reading from that place isn’t considered real, then your brand being associated that information.”

The findings come as the programmatic world braces for extreme turbulence. Research by PageFair found that just 3% of brands surveyed believe users will opt-in for third party tracking on websites.

Suh said it isn’t clear how much havoc GDPR will wreak on programmatic advertising, but there will definitely be “growing pains.”

“In GDPR world, [publishers] are going to be adopting a consent management platform to ensure that the user knows what data is being collected on the website,” he said.

“What we’ve seen is, widely, publishers are still trying to figure out what platform they want to use. That’s important, because those are signals that are going to be passed through the bid request to programmatic buyers. So, without that platform adoption happening at the publisher side, those signals won’t be coming along as readily available to buyers, and then as a buyer you would say, ‘if I don’t see those signals I won’t bid on that,’ or it may be a less valuable piece of inventory.”

Suh believes advertisers will have to jump through multiple hoops before programmatic is brought up to speed.

At a glance: GDPR around the world
– 58% of people in the UK and Germany have heard of GDPR, 63% in Sweden

– 93% of consumers in non-EU countries would like at least one of the rules brought about by GDPR to be in effect in their country

– Worldwide, consumers are most comfortable sharing biometric data (fitness trackers as best practice examples for brands)

– Less than one-third of consumers in the UK, Germany and Sweden trust brands to ask their permission before sharing data with third parties

– But 63% of consumers worldwide trust brands more when they are clear about how and where there data is used

– 60% of people worldwide believe that more than half the news they read on social media is fake — this number is highest in India where it rises to 71%

– 43% of people worldwide say their trust in advertising on social media has dropped significantly in the last few months — 43% in the US, 51% in the UK

The most requested changes in data policy
– Australia: 67% want the right to delete data collected at any time
– Singapore: 67% want the right to delete data collected at any time
– Japan: 54% want the right to delete data collected at any time
– India: 63% want the right to ask how their data is being used at any time

Source: campaignasia.com; 24 May 2018

Time Spent with Media, Ad Spending and Trends in China

Consumers in China are known for their digital savviness. For many, digital is their first choice to consume media, with much of that time spent on mobile devices. Content that was previously viewed or read through traditional media is now being consumed via digital and mobile devices.

Much like in the US, digital video is challenging linear TV as the delivery system for entertainment and advertising, and it has given rise to new video categories, including “short-form” video and live streaming.

The trio of digital powerhouses known as “BAT”—Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent—are leading the advertising market due to the popularity of their digital platforms.

– Ad spending on digital overtook traditional media in 2016. Since then, digital has only grown in its dominance as the preferred channel among advertisers in China. We expect digital ad spending to reach $61.81 billion in 2018, growing at a rate of 25.0% for the year. Digital will capture 64.6% of total media ad spending.

– Over three-quarters of digital ad spending will be allocated to mobile in 2018, with the rest going to desktops/laptops and other nonmobile devices.

– In 2018, Alibaba’s net digital ad revenues in China, derived from its core commerce as well as its video-on-demand (VOD) subsidiary Youku Tudou, will exceed $20 billion. (That’s more than Baidu and Tencent combined, and surpasses traditional TV ad spending for the first time.)

– Of the 6 hours, 23 minutes per day adults in China will spend consuming media this year, 55.5% will go to digital media (including 47.1% to internet-connected activities), followed by 39.8% to TV, 1.6% to print and 3.1% to radio.

– We forecast that slightly over a quarter of digital time will be spent watching video in 2018, rising to almost one-third by 2020.

Source: emarketer.com; 15 May 2018

Five Surprising Facts About China’s Internet Users

As China enters the Year of the Dog, the latest data from China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) shows how the country’s digital landscape has changed over the past 12 months. Here are five surprising facts about digital usage in China.

No. 1: There Is Room for Much, Much More Growth

The number of internet users is growing quickly, but the market is nowhere close to saturated.

During 2017, China added 40.7 million new internet users, bringing the total to 772.0 million. That’s the largest single internet market in the world by far, but still represents just 55.8% of China’s population. So there is plenty of room to grow.

What’s stopping people from accessing the internet? Two obstacles cited by CNNIC are computer illiteracy and the inability to type in Pinyin (the romanized version of Chinese).

Emerging technologies like voice recognition could play an important role in bringing the internet to the rest of the population.

No. 2: It’s a Mobile Market

By the end of 2017, 752.7 million internet users in China accessed the web on their mobile devices, representing 97.5% of all internet users in the country. That compares with 95.1% a year prior.

Other access methods trailed far behind, the CNNIC data showed: For instance, barely half (53.0%) of all internet users went online via desktop. For laptops, the level was 35.8%. And for tablets, it was 27.1%.

No. 3: Rural and Unconnected

At 2017’s end, rural internet users made up 27.0% of all of internet users in China, the CNNIC found. However, 42.7% of the country’s population resides in the countryside, based on data from the National Bureau of Statistics China.

In effect, rural areas are China’s biggest untapped internet market.

No. 4: Internet Time Is Growing Rapidly

People in China are spending an unprecedented amount of time online. In 2017, average weekly time spent reached 27 hours, up about 36 minutes from a year ago—the fastest that measure has grown in three years.

Growth drivers are about what you might expect: video-on-demand (VOD), live streaming, social networks and online shopping.

No. 5: The Online/Offline Blur

In a country where mobile payments are far more common than in the US and other markets, online-to-offline (O2O) activity has soared.

Food ordering, ride hailing (taxi or private car) and travel purchases all saw rapid growth. The latest CNNIC data showed that 44.5% of China’s internet users ordered food online in 2017, an increase of 64.6% vs. 2016.

Source: emarketer.com; 26 Feb 2018

F1 makes biggest ever investment in digital as it looks to serve fans better

F1’s marketing boss admits it hasn’t served fans as well as it could have in the past, but hopes a new TV app will bring them closer to the brand.

Formula One is making its biggest investment in digital to date with the launch of an over-the-top live subscription service, as it looks to change brand perceptions and serve its fans better.

F1 TV will launch across 40 markets – including Germany, France and the USA but not in the UK – next month, in time for the upcoming Formula One season. It will allow fans to watch ad-free live streams of each race, while on-board cameras will show live content from the driver’s point of view.

Speaking to Marketing Week at Mobile World Congress on Tuesday (27 February), Formula One’s marketing director, Ellie Norman, said 2018 is about “launching the brand” – and F1 TV will play a pivotal role in opening up the business to new digital opportunities.

“Previously, we definitely had a logo but we didn’t have an identity,” Norman said. “What we did have was a series of perceptions that we are working hard to change.”

Norman, who joined Formula One last August, said her main focus this year is building Formula One an identity with fans “at the heart”.

“For us this is a real step-change from the sport as it was in the past, which fans definitely felt wasn’t there to serve them,” Norman said.

“Every decision we are making is about how it serves the fan, so if it doesn’t serve the fan, it doesn’t serve Formula One.”

The app will launch without any advertising, but Norman said Formula One is open to conversations “if there is a relevance there” to improve the customer experience.

Alongside F1 TV, Norman said ‘fan festivals’ will also be key to bringing people closer to the sport.

Following a successful launch in London last summer, another four events are lined up this year in Shanghai, Marseilles, Berlin and Miami.

“It’s an opportunity for us to take some of those core elements of Formula One but to take them into city centres; to an audience that has never engaged with, or been to a Formula One race before,” Norman explained. “The ambition is to increase that number to 15 in 2019.”

Source: marketingweek.com; 28 Feb 2018